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Rabbit Fever Missouri Tularemia

TULAREMIA (RABBIT FEVER)

MO CONSERVATION

Tularemia in a rabbit liver

Tularemia in a rabbit liver
James Runnigen, U.S. Geological Survey

COMMONLY INFECTED WILDLIFE

Rabbits, muskrats, beavers, any mammal.

IS THIS ANIMAL INFECTED?

Affected animals may appear in good body condition, yet be sick or near death.

An enlarged liver or spleen is common.

Tiny pale spots may be seen on the liver.

CAN I GET IT?

Yes, from multiple pathways: bites from infected ticks or biting flies; bites or scratches from infected wildlife; contact of eyes, nose, mouth, or open wound with meat, water, feces, urine, or body parts of infected animals; ingestion of meat from infected animals that has not been cooked thoroughly; drinking water contaminated by an infectious animal; or breathing in dust from contaminated pelts and soil.

How bad can it get?

Tularemia can be fatal; early treatment reduces severity.

Symptoms in humans

  • Symptoms can appear up to 14 days after infection and often start as flu-like illness.
  • Additional symptoms depend on the route of exposure:
  • Ingestion of contaminated food or water: diarrhea and vomiting.
  • Tick or fly bite, or contamination of open wound: skin ulcers at site of bite and swollen, painful lymph nodes.
  • Inhalation: respiratory symptoms, pain in chest, difficulty breathing.
  • Seek medical attention immediately if infection is suspected.

PROTECT MYSELF AND OTHERS

  • Take precautions to avoid bites from ticks and biting flies.
  • When handling, dressing, or skinning any wild animal, wear disposable gloves, and wash hands with soap and water.
  • Cook all meat thoroughly.

SAFE FOR PETS?

No. Tularemia can be fatal to pets. Contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has been infected. Effective antibiotic treatment is available.

WHAT CAUSES IT?

Bacterium called Francisella tularensis.

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Missouri Raccoons and others carry DISTEMPER DISEASE

DISTEMPER

MO CONSERVATION

Distemper

Distemper
JR Compton

COMMONLY INFECTED WILDLIFE

Mammals (carnivores), especially raccoons, foxes, coyotes, skunks, otters, and bobcats.

IS THIS ANIMAL INFECTED?

Clinical signs vary, but may include coughing or difficulty breathing, thickened skin on the nose and footpads, thick discharge or crusting around the eyes and nose, and abnormal behavior, including convulsions or loss of coordination.

The viruses cannot survive very long in the environment, so infection from contact with a contaminated surface or object is rare.

Juvenile animals are more susceptible to disease.

CAN I GET IT?

Distemper viruses are not known to infect humans.

How bad can it get?

Distemper viruses are not known to infect humans.

Symptoms in humans

Distemper viruses are not known to infect humans.

PROTECT MYSELF AND OTHERS

Affected animals should not be handled. Although distemper viruses are not known to infect humans, rabies, a potentially deadly disease, causes similar clinical signs in the animals it affects.

SAFE FOR PETS?

No. Dogs and cats are at risk of contracting distemper. It is highly recommended that domestic dogs and cats be vaccinated for protection against distemper. This should be discussed with your veterinarian.

WHAT CAUSES IT?

Canine and feline distemper are caused by two different viruses that affect wild and domestic carnivores.

Distemper is highly contagious between animals. The viruses are spread by direct contact with mouth or eye secretions, or through inhalation of infected respiratory droplets.

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MO Turkey – LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASE VIRUS

LYMPHOPROLIFERATIVE DISEASE VIRUS in Turkey (LPDV)

MO CONSERVATION

Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus

Lymphoproliferative Disease Virus
Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study

COMMONLY INFECTED WILDLIFE

Wild turkey.

IS THIS ANIMAL INFECTED?

Birds may appear disoriented or weak and are often found dead.

Scabby nodules on the skin of the legs and head also commonly occur.

This disease of wild turkey is so newly discovered that much remains unknown.

CAN I GET IT?

LPDV is not known to infect humans.

How bad can it get?

No human health risk has been reported.

Symptoms in humans

LPDV is not known to infect humans.

PROTECT MYSELF AND OTHERS

MDC advises against consuming any wild animal that appears sick.

SAFE FOR PETS?

LPDV is not known to infect pets, but it is safest to avoid feeding infected birds to pets.

WHAT CAUSES IT?

LPDV is caused by a retrovirus. Little is known about the origin of LPDV in the United States. The significance to wild turkey populations is currently unknown.

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HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE Deer in Missouri

HEMORRHAGIC DISEASE

MO Conservation

Deer Victim of Hemorrhagic Disease

Deer Victim of Hemorrhagic Disease
Nate Mechlin

COMMONLY INFECTED WILDLIFE

In Missouri, deer and elk may be infected.

IS THIS ANIMAL INFECTED?

Single or multiple dead deer may be found in late summer or early fall near water sources with no apparent disease symptoms.

Clinical signs in deer are variable but may include unwillingness to move, difficulty breathing, swelling of the head, neck, or tongue, lameness, and weight loss. Most deer die quickly from the disease and therefore have no obvious clinical signs.

HD is not directly contagious between infected animals.

CAN I GET IT?

No. Hemorrhagic disease is not known to infect people.

How bad can it get?

There is no known risk to humans.

Symptoms in humans

None. Humans are not at risk.

PROTECT MYSELF AND OTHERS

  • The viruses that cause HD do not infect people.
  • There is no risk from handling or eating meat from deer with HD.
  • HD may weaken the animal’s immune system, allowing secondary bacterial infections to develop in the sick animal and make the meat unsuitable for consumption.

SAFE FOR PETS?

Yes. Meat is generally safe for pets to consume, if no secondary bacterial infections are present and meat is cooked properly.

WHAT CAUSES IT?

Biting midge flies in the genus Culicoides spread the viruses that cause the disease.

In North America, there are two viruses that cause HD: epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) and bluetongue virus (BTV).

Different strains (subtypes) of these viruses exist, with varying levels of virulence.

Livestock, such as cattle and sheep, may be infected with the HD viruses. Clinical signs vary with the species. Consult your veterinarian for more information on HD in livestock.

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CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD) Missouri

CHRONIC WASTING DISEASE (CWD)

Chronic Wasting Disease

Chronic Wasting Disease
Mike Hopper, Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) is a deadly illness in white-tailed deer and other members of the deer family. CWD kills all deer it infects. The disease has been found in Missouri and is slowly spreading. The Missouri Department of Conservation is working with conservation partners to find cases and limit its spread.

MANDATORY SAMPLING IN 25 COUNTIES NOV. 11 AND 12

  • Hunters who harvest deer in 25 select counties must present their deer to MDC staff for CWD sampling.
  • Mandatory sampling is only required during opening weekend of firearms deer season, Nov. 11 and 12.
  • MDC will provide 56 sampling stations throughout the 25 select counties.
  • Sampling locations will be open 7:30 a.m. until at least 8 p.m.
  • Deer must be presented by the hunter who harvested the animal.
  • Deer may be field dressed before being taken to a sampling station.
  • Hunters can also present just the deer head with about six inches of neck attached.
  • For taxidermy bucks, the cape may be removed prior to being taken to a sampling station as long as about six inches of the neck is left attached.