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Hunter shoots unusually large coyote in Northwest Missouri

JEFFERSON CITY Mo – DNA tests show that a 104-pound canine shot by a hunter in Carroll County Nov. 13 was an unusually large coyote.
The hunter shot the big canine on opening day of Missouri’s November firearms deer season, thinking it was a coyote. Coyotes are legal game during deer season. However, when the hunter saw the animal’s size, he wondered if he had mistakenly shot a wolf. He reported the kill to Conservation Agent Marc Bagley. Bagley took possession of the animal and turned it over to the Missouri Department of Conservation’s (MDC) Resource Science Division for identification.
Resource Scientist Jeff Beringer said the MDC staff took measurements and collected tissue and hair samples for DNA analysis. The test showed the animal was a coyote.
According to Beringer, the coyote was a male approximately 3 years old. It had no tattoos, microchip or evidence of ear tags that would indicate it might have escaped or been released from captivity.
The coyote’s size and the size and shape of its feet were similar to those of a wolf, leading to speculation it could be a coyote-wolf hybrid. Gray wolves, also known as timber wolves, once inhabited northern Missouri but were gone from the state by the late 1800s, due to hunting and habitat loss. Wolves persisted in Minnesota. From there, they dispersed into Wisconsin and Michigan, which now have wolf populations of their own.
The last record of a gray wolf in Missouri was of a young male mistaken for a coyote and killed by a bowhunter in Grundy County in October 2001. A radio collar and ear tag linked that 80-pound wolf to Michigan.
The Wild Mammals of Missouri, the definitive text on Show-Me State mammals, indicates a normal weight range of 18 to 30 pounds for coyotes. However, much larger specimens have been documented in other states.
Wolves are a protected species in Missouri. According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the grey wolf is listed as a federally endangered species in the lower 48 states, except in Minnesota and where there are non-essential experimental populations.
Beringer said the MDC has never stocked wolves and has no plans to restore them to Missouri.

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Easy Home Made PVC Deer Feeders

deer feederMaterials for 3 feeders:

  • 1 – 10 foot 4″ (100mm) PVC drainage pipe ( $12.19)(Prices Jan 2010)
  • 3 – Y female 4″ fittings MxFxF ( $5.29 each)
  • 6 – end caps for 4″ pipe ( $2.48 each)
  • 3 – 3″ to 4″ nails
  • 12 – ½” wood screws or sheet metal self-tapping screws

Assembly instructions:

Cut the flared end off the 10′ pipe. Use a wood saw – it is soft material. Cut the pipe into 3 equal length pieces, and sand the cut edges so they are smooth for an easy fit to the caps. Drill a 3/8″ hole on the printed side about 4″ from one end – this is for the nail that is holding the feeder onto a tree. The printed side will be against the tree. Put a large nail – 3″ to 4″ long, into the tree trunk at about eye level – 5 feet from the ground. Leave about 1″ sticking out to hang the feeder. Attach the female Y connector to the other end of the pipe, with the Y facing the opposite direction from the drilled hole. You can use glue for a permanent connection, or the ½” wood screws for easy disassembly if needed. Pre-drill the holes for the screws with 1/8″ drill. 2 screws should do for each connection. Attach a cap to the bottom of the Y with 2 screws. Try to use short screws so they don’t protrude inside to hurt the deer. File points if necessary. Fill the tube with whole corn, loosely place the cap on top of the pipe, and hang from a nail hammered into a tree about 5 feet from the ground. I get my corn in bulk (50 pound) bags from the local farm supply store. Whole corn works great by itself, and easily slides through the pipe. 

https://mail.google.com/mail/?ui=2&ik=68b7939a1f&view=att&th=131339b121f13fb7&attid=0.1&disp=inline&zw

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First Aid Reminder

First Aid Reminder
How many of you carry a first aid kit in your pack or vehicle? I try to keep one handy as often as possible. You just never know if something minor or major could pop up. I was reminded of this recently when I watched my fishing buddy run a barbed hook deep into his had. We had no choice so we jerked it out, leaving a huge gash behind.

With blood starting to gush I dropped my bag and whipped out my first aid kit. After a quick cleansing I put a bandage on the wound and wrapped it with some athletic tape to hold it in place.

It could have been worse with stitches or even a broken bone, but regardless the first aid kit came in handy and I’m glad it was stowed in my tackle bag.

Take a quick inventory of your gear and make sure a first aid kit is always on board. If not, hit our catalog at http://ssisports.net and get stocked up.

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Show ‘Em Your Hooks North American Hunting Club

Show ‘Em Your Hooks North American Hunting Club


Most turkey hunters can agree there are four special reasons chasing gobblers can easily become a lifelong obsession: strutting toms, ground-shaking gobbles, long beards and big ol’ hooks.
If you’ve harvested a mature tom, then—beyond the delicious table fare—you’ve earned yourself a “trophy” in all senses of the word. Gobblers possess stunning physical characteristics, making them one of the most beautiful game animals on the planet—and that means awesome mounts!
Many turkey hunters go with the traditional tail fan mount, and often the beard will be included. It’s a common display because it’s easy to create. But personally—and I know I’m not alone—I get real fired-up over spurs. There’s nothing like walking up on a freshly killed limb-hanger.
If you’re like me, you’ve found yourself asking, What can I do to show-off a tom’s spurs? After several successful seasons in the turkey woods, I’ve managed to get the spur-finishing process down to somewhat of a simple science.
From The Field
You’ve finally tagged a gobbler. The victory photos have been snapped. You’ve hauled him back to camp (or home) and trimmed the prized meat from every possible bone. At this point, you’re free to claim some trophies to honor your bird forever. Cut his beard and colorful tail fan off for display. If your bird is at least 2 years old, chances are he’s got some spurs worth claiming, too.
Remove the bird’s legs at the first leg joint above each spur. You can do this with a sharp knife, but a bone saw is ideal. If you have a small brush saw or clippers, those will also likely do the trick. You can freeze the legs for later spur removal, or you can get right to it if you have the time and proper tools handy. I’ve found it’s easiest to complete the entire spur-finishing process while the legs are still “fresh.”

Gather Your Tools
No project ends desirably without starting with the proper tools. Thankfully, for finishing spurs, you don’t need much to get the job done. You probably have many of the necessary tools lying around somewhere. The basic list is as follows:
– Small, strong, scissor-like cutting tool (Wire cutters work great.)
– Small, long needle-nose pliers
– Small wire brush
– Clamp (I recommend a bench vice.)
– Bone saw (An electric Sawzall makes life much easier.)
– Sanding tool (You can use basic sandpaper, but a bench grinder is nice.)
– Long metal nail
– Safety glasses
– Warm water and sanitizing dish soap
– Cup of bleach
– Clear nail polish
– Fishing line or thin string
– Rubber gloves and respiratory mask (These are optional, but nice.)

Spur Removal
If you haven’t already done so in the field, you’ll want to remove the spurs from the turkey’s lower legs. This is the first step toward an awesome spur display.
(Tip: If you opted to purchase rubber gloves, wear them now. Also, wear safety glasses.) Clamp each leg against your work bench surface, or between the jaws of your bench vice, one at a time. Don’t clamp the legs too tight, or you risk breaking the bones. Allow each leg to hang over the edge of the work bench surface for sawing.
Take your bone saw and cut the spurs off each leg, leaving approximately 1 inch of leg bone on each side of the spurs.
Leg Flesh Removal
Once the spurs are removed from the turkey’s legs, it’s time to eliminate all the surrounding flesh and tendons, and also the marrow from the center of the leg bone. This is the dirtiest part of the spur-finishing process, but well worth the effort.

Take the metal nail and run it through the center hollow bone channel to push out the bone marrow.
You’ll notice there are actually three hollow channels. The only channel you want to keep is the center one, which is surrounded by solid leg bone. When the spur-finishing process is final, you’ll be able to feed a string through this center channel for displaying your spurs.
Use the cutting tool and needle-nose pliers to remove all the flesh surrounding the center channel.
Use the wire brush the brush off remaining pieces of flesh from the bone. (Tip: Grasp the spurs with the needle-nose pliers while brushing.)
Sanding/Grinding
Now that all the unnecessary fleshy parts are removed from your spurs, you’re able to start visualizing the final product. But you’re not “off the hooks” yet.
(Tip: If you decided to purchase a respiratory mask, now is when you should use it. You’ll be grinding bone, which can create some unpleasant dust in the air.) Use the abrasion of your sanding tool, sandpaper or bench grinder to shape and smooth out the hollow bone that holds each spur. Be careful to not grind all the way through the bone. Once you’re satisfied with the length and shape of each bone, you’re finished with the dirty work of the spur-finishing process.
Sanitizing
This step will help to sanitize your spurs, thereby killing bacteria and eliminating most unpleasant odor.
Soak your spurs in warm water and sanitizing dish soap. Lightly scrub each spur to remove any remnant bits of flesh. (Tip: When you look at a turkey’s spur, you’re actually seeing an outer spur “cap” that covers a smaller spur bone. If for some reason a spur cap falls off, simply dry the spur bone and spur cap after the sanitizing step is complete, then glue the spur cap back on to the spur bone.)
Pour a small cup of bleach. Carefully, one at a time, grasp each spur by the sharp ends (not the hollow bone ends) with your needle-nose pliers. Submerge each hollow bone (not the entire spur) in the bleach for at least 1 minute; this will help whiten the bone and finalize sanitization.
Allow your spurs to completely dry. You can pat them with towels, use a fan or both. Once dry, you can immediately proceed to the final step.
Polishing
This is the final step in the spur-finishing process.
Thread your fishing line or thin string through the hollow leg bone channel. Tie each end of the line to two separate objects, allowing the spurs to hang freely in the air.
Apply one or two coats of clear nail polish to each leg bone/spur. Allow the polish to completely dry.
You’ve now officially finished your cherished wild turkey spurs. Proudly show them off for years to come!
)

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Great Trout Fishing Near St. Louis

https://i0.wp.com/image62.webshots.com/462/9/25/77/2561925770015598663QnfKdp_ph.jpg?resize=320%2C211Maramec Spring is an exceptionally beautiful spring and produces an average of 96,000,000 gallons of water per day.  The spring branch here is a mile long, with no fishing allowed upstream of the road bridge.  Unlike the other three Missouri trout parks, Maramec has no separate fishing zones. Owned and operated by the foundation authorized and funded up by Mrs. Lucy Wortham James, 300 of the park’s 1800 acres are available for public use. From 1826 to 1876, this area was the site of Maramec Iron Works, the first successful ironworks west of the Mississippi. In addition to trout fishing, Maramec Spring Park has a nice reception center, cafe, campground, picnic areas, two museums, playgrounds, hiking trails, tennis courts, and the historic ironworks for which it is so well known. For more information about Maramec Spring, be sure to see the website of The James Foundation located at www.maramecspringpark.com or call the James Foundation office at (573) 265-7124.  The hatchery office telephone number is (573) 265-7801, and you can reach the Maramec Museum at (573) 265-3527.

Justin Cox
http://Blueribbonlures.com

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Trout Park Report for Missouri

Missouri Trout Park Update

Bennett Spring State Park: 54 degrees, the spring level is near normal and still clearing; Zone 1 and 2 best lures: John Deere colored mini jigs, ginger colored and brown colored bead head Cracklebacks, gingersnap with 8 oz. gold head colored, red and black colored, red and white colored and black and yellow colored marabou jigs, black colored with a silver spinner and white colored with a silver spinner Rooster Tails, shrimp colored, chartreuse colored and easter egg colored glo balls; Zone 3 best lures: white with glitter colored and yellow with glitter colored Power Baits, Trout Nip and salmon eggs. Fishing hours for June are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. Weed cutting is planned for June 21 and 22. We will start around 8 a.m. and finish by 3 p.m. We will start in Zone 3 and work our way upstream. (Report made on 6/16/2011)

Maramec Spring Park: 56 degrees, fishing is good; the water is slowly falling and clearing up; dough and putty baits are producing good numbers; fish free floating or underneath a float; feather jigs in black/yellow, olive, white, and pink are producing good numbers of fish; fishing hours for the month of June are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. (Report made on 6/16/2011)

Montauk State Park: 57 degrees, the river level is 3 inches higher than normal; the water is clear; fishing is good on most baits; dough and putty baits are working well, as are flies and jigs; the best fishing is during the morning and evening hours. June fishing hours are 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.

For up-to-date stream conditions check http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis/uv?07064440 (Report made on 6/16/2011)

Roaring River State Park: 58 degrees, the river is clear and running normal; plastic worms and power eggs are working very well; use scented baits in zones allowed; spinners are good; Rooster Tail-type spinners in black, brown, olive and bright orange have all been good; nightcrawlers are good in Zone 3.

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Why Has Bass Fishing Become Popular????

More and more people these days of all age groups and circles are starting to become aware of the attractions that bass fishing offers. Bass fishing doesn’t exactly get the type of attention and coverage that other sports get. Rarely will you ever see any headline news about anything fishing related, whether it be television or any other type of media. It takes more than looking at bass fishing infomercials to comprehend why bass fishing is now the number one freshwater sport today in America.
Substantial Growth
In comparison to the other types of fishing, you might be surprised to learn that the popularity of bass fishing has increased by 70%. Moreover, in the last twenty five years the bass fishing business has grown by leaps and bounds, going from a million dollar to a bordering five billion dollar industry. Each year, the business still continues to grow.
These figures might cause one to wonder what all the excitement is about with bass fishing that has lead to this amount of growth in such as short period of time. The amount of media coverage is increasing, as tournaments are sometimes televised. Also, many are using it as a means for vacationing, especially with Florida being one of the hot spots. The creation of the associations such as Bass Anglers Sportsman Society (BASS) helped increase the popularity as well.
This is a sport that doesn’t require a lot of equipment or experience to do for fun. Also, it doesn’t need a certain amount of people to participate in, like team sports for instance. One can go out of his or her own if desired. Also, the cost of the equipment is not too expensive, opening the door for just about anyone regardless of income level to get involved.
Spending Time With Others
Fishing also allows families to get the opportunity to spend more time with one another. You can create special memories with your loved ones by sharing these joyful times together. This will certainly bring your family closer.
One of the new slogans that is making the rounds is ‘Get kids hooked on fishing, not drugs’. This is actually a program for kids that helps them develop life skills. If you are a father, fishing is a great chance to spend time with your son and keep him away from any possible negative influences, such as drugs. Plus, there is nothing like being outdoors on a beautiful summer day catching fish.

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Protein Feeders for Deer Hunting, Management

Protein Feeders for Deer Hunting, Management

DEER MANAGEMENT | 14 June, 2011 | No Comment
Hunters across the white-tailed deer’s range know that one of the best deer management practices out there is providing free-choice supplemental feed. In Texas, many hunters use food plots in the fall for deer hunting purposes, but more ranches use protein feeders for deer hunting than other other method of supplemental feeding. Protein pellets were initially offered in troughs, then came the feeder tubes and now this interesting protein feeder design from a well-known manufacturer.
Texas Hunter Products, a San Antonio based company known for making quality products for outdoor enthusiasts for over 50 years, has developed and patented a new feeder that makes feeding protein pellets easy and cost effective. Bob Brock, the company’s president had this to say about the feeder, “It’s one of the simplest and most affordable ways to accelerate antler growth in deer populations.”

Protein Feeders for Whitetail Deer Hunting and Management

The benefits of supplemental feeding as a part of an overall deer management operation have been well-document by numerous scientific studies. One big problem many hunters have is that they try to dispense protein pellets using times feeders, but it always ends in disaster. One problem is that the feed is not fed fast enough to prevent mildew, and the other problem is timed feeders do not provide adequate, supplemental nutrition.
This new protein feeder design features a patented two-part funnel system that doesn’t require any moving parts, but always keeps the high-protein food fresh. The design provides deer with clean, dry supplemental feed on demand. That is a good thing for whitetail deer as well as the hunter, because the costs of wasted feed can add up fast.
“It’s important to get a good fit for the rain guards that are installed around the feed ports. These rain guards help prevent water from getting to the feed and ensure that the feed remains dry and fresh” says Brock. Also included are heavy-duty legs with large welded footpads and 24-inch stabilizing stakes used to anchor the feeder to the ground. And the feeder is affordable at just under $230.
The manufacturer says the feeder will dispense corn, protein pellets, soybeans and black-eyed peas. The majority of hunters fill their feeders from 50 pound bags, so it helps that the feeder is easy to fill at less than 6 feet in height. “It’s easy for the customer to fill, it’s easy for the deer to eat and the feed remains dry and fresh. Those three things coupled with a quality protein feed are the key ingredients to improving the antler growth of a deer population”, says Brock.
I think the design of this feeder will work well for most whitetail deer hunters because it is simple, easy to transport and easy to fill. It is perfect for those that have a deer lease. For landowners and hunters interested in using protein feeders to improve their whitetail deer management program and deer hunting, a free-choice protein feeder is a step in the right direction. To get adequate nutrition to each and every deer on your property, a protein feeder density of at least one feeder for every 250 acres is recommended.

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State seeks input on deer hunting rules

State seeks input on deer hunting rules

State seeks input on deer hunting rules

Updated: Thursday, 16 Jun 2011, 8:07 AM EDT
Published : Thursday, 16 Jun 2011, 8:07 AM EDT

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) – Indiana residents with an opinion on the state’s proposed new deer-hunting rules will have two chances next month to speak out.

Public hearings will be held July 25 at the Spring Mill Inn near Mitchell and July 26 at the Miami County Fairgrounds in Peru. The Indiana Natural Resources Commission gave its preliminary approval to the proposed changes in January but needs the hearings before giving final approval.

The changes include proposals to expand the state’s deer-hunting seasons and legalize the use of crossbows during archery season.

Indiana wants to reduce the state’s deer population because the animals eat crops and native plant life and cause a large number of collisions with cars.