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Special Sale Items of the Week for December 15

Specials

 

 

Specials!

Save Big

 

 

SKU: 4015593

MPN: LXH001

UPC: 149780001750

 

Mantis Assisted Opening Knife

 

MSRP: $29.99

Special: $19.99

 

SKU: 103546

MPN: 8700

UPC: 087171035468

 

MSRP: $59.99

Special: $39.99

 

SKU: 4015594

MPN: FT0101

UPC: 0149780509911

 

Mantis Tactical Axe w/Sheath 11.5″ Overall 4.5″ Blade

 

MSRP: $59.99

Special: $39.99

 

SKU: 9005655

UPC: 6957883845713

Jetbeam Mini-Al Keychain Flashlight Black Aluminum

 

 

MSRP: $37.60

Special: $29.99

 

SKU: 2160784

MPN: 62NGMLV

 

Cold Steel Medium G-10 Espada – Gray

 

MSRP: $179.99

Special: $119.99

 

SKU: 2160169

MPN: NU30 BLACK

UCP: 6952506402526

 

Nitecore 400 Lumen NU30 Headlamp Black

 

MSRP: $47.95

Special: $37.95

 

*Ends Dec. 21st or While Supplies Last*

 

Blue Ribbon Lures
314-313-2233

 

 

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Great Reasons to Go Fishing

Top 10 Reasons to Go Fishing

There is no need to convince the thousands of Virginians and avid outdoors men and women, who get excited by reeling in a 30-pound striper or seeing a beautiful brook trout rise to a fly, why they need to start making plans to head outside. But if for some reason, you need a little convincing, we have compiled a list of 10 good examples that might just offer you an excuse to call in sick to work or leave those “honey do’s” for another weekend so you too can spend a day fishing.

  1. Contribute to Conservation: Anglers put their money where their mouth is and are passionate about the environment. By purchasing fishing licenses and paying special taxes that they themselves have agreed upon anglers have helped to fund many of the wildlife and conservation programs that exist in the United States and here in Virginia. They also contribute to non-game and education programs, and to the purchase of thousands of acres of public lands, where everyone is welcome to recreate year round. Anglers are also acutely aware of the importance of clean water and air and pride themselves on protecting and preserving our environment, natural communities, and valuable habitat.
  2. Stress Relief: Ask most anglers why they enjoy spending time in the outdoors and you’re likely to hear the word “freedom.” Spending a day afield casting for trout on a cool mountain stream or bobber fishing for bluegills on a pond helps to release us from our highly stressful, everyday environment. Nothing brings on the sense of being alive and helps to rebuild our personal reserves like a day spent interacting with nature.
  3. Social Bonding: Sharing a fishing experience helps strengthen relationships with family and friends. It also offers a person the chance to give back to society through mentoring others in the pleasure and importance of being good stewards of our natural resources.
  4. Supports Wildlife and Fisheries Management: Angling is an important wildlife management tool. For more than 100 years anglers have helped to contribute to wildlife and fisheries management efforts by helping to set seasons and creel limits. Wildlife populations of most fish species remain stable and in some cases flourish, a far cry from a decade ago when many species suffered from over harvest and the ill effects of pollution. Anglers also have a vested interest in and support many efforts to preserve and protect all species and the environment-all the while helping to increase biodiversity.
  5. Health Benefits: More than fifty percent of Americans are overweight. Being outside and being active helps to make you feel better and encourages a healthier way of life. Driving to your local grocery store and fast food restaurant might be convenient, but fishing can also help you burn those unwanted calories, increase the quality of your lifestyle, and add years to your life.
  6. Recreation: Having a bad day of fishing still beats a day in the office or tending to house chores. The most common reason you will find with people who like to fish is that it is simply fun, whether you enjoy trolling for stripers or outwitting a weary brook trout with a hand-tied fly that imitates an insect the size of a pin head.
  7. Self Fulfillment: Fishing offers you the chance to improve your self-esteem through respect for the environment, mastering outdoor skills and achieving personal goals. Fishing can also play an important role in ones personal and social development. Fishing is a lifetime skill and activity that can be enjoyed at any age. Just ask a youngster who reeled in their first fish how much fun fishing can be.
  8. Boost to the Economy: Virginia’s anglers generate millions in state and local taxes and directly support thousands jobs, that gives an economic boost that any state government would be pleased with.
  9. Fishing for Food: Wild fish are low in fat and cholesterol and high in protein. In fact, the American Heart Association recommends a regular diet of fish. Besides it’s a lot more challenging to catch that plate of fresh fish than to stroll endlessly down a supermarket aisle if you decide to keep your catch.
  10. The Thrill: Fishing has a way of fulfilling an age-old need of pursuing and catching. The thrill lies in the challenge, such as stalking an elusive wild trout or matching the hatch. But there are many who will be quick to profess that it’s not the catching of fish that’s important, but the immeasurable life lessons that you will experience along the way.
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Why is Fishing Good for Your Health

5 Reasons Why Fishing Is Good For Your Health

Fishing is actually really good for your health.

fishi4

No, seriously. While this may sound like an excuse some guy is making to his wife to let him skip something important to go chase fish on a Saturday, this is a legitimate claim to make. Fishing is a healthy activity, plain and simple.

Now, if you ever do need some help in convincing someone to let you go fishing (wife, mother-in-law, your kid whose dance recital you’ll be missing) you can always bust out these tips to help your argument.

View the slideshow to see the reasons, and leave your own in the comments.

1. Exercise

Unless you’re on a boat, fishing is great exercise. Wading through rivers and flinging flies or lures at fish for eight hours a day is actually pretty good aerobics. You’re not going to lose weight doing it, but you’ll improve your overall cardiovascular health.

2. Low Impact Movement

Running is awesome and everything, but it really does a number on your knees. While steep hiking to streams or ponds might stress your knees also, most simple wading while fishing is incredibly low-impact.

You get all the benefits of moving around a lot without all the wear and tear on your joints.

3. Relaxation

Fishing calms your mind down, plain and simple. Being out in nature, away from the computer and your phone (unless you’re using it for pictures!) lets your brain relax and focus on one simple task – catching fish.

Not to mention, sunlight and all the Vitamin D that comes with it are great health benefits to being outside with a fishing rod in hand.

 

4. Dexterity

Fishing, especially fly-fishing, involves a lot of small and intricate movements. As you get older, some of these finer motor skills seem to deteriorate, but fishing can help them stay sharper longer. You’ll also use a lot of muscles that don’t normally get a lot of work when you’re fishing, especially ones in your arms and back.

5. Fun

In the words of the immortal John Gierach, “Fun is something you can’t measure.”

Having fun, and just simply enjoying yourself, is a huge health benefit. Being and feeling happy is something that seems to be harder and harder to achieve these days, and taking time out of life to spend it fishing can work wonders for every area of your life.

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Spyderco Knives One of the Best Now on SALE

Spyderco Delica4 Stainless Steel SpyderEdge

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SKU: 400416
UPC:  716104004164
MFG:  Spyderco
Your Price:  $99.97
Dealer Price:  $67.48
MSRP:  $134.95

Description

Trainers or drones are non-sharpened knives that allow for the safe practice of Martial Blade Craft (MBC). They let the user learn deployment/retrieval techniques, perform drills, and develop confidence and muscle memory without risking cutting themselves or others with a sharp blade. The Delica Trainer is identical in weight and size to the ‘live’ model. To enhance the balance of the piece we’ve tapered the unsharpened tip and drilled holes through the blade, removing unnecessary bulk. Volcano grip texturing on both sides of the handle put the brakes on your hand slipping while training. All Spyderco training models have red handles designating them as non-sharpened. Tip-up carry. Delica trainers also fit the bill as a unsharpened practice knife to safely teach non-knife people the fundamental movements in safely opening and closing a folder.
  • AUS-6 blade steel
  • stainless-steel handle
  • blade thickness is 3/32 in
  • stianless steel clip
  • diameter of blade hole is 15/32 in

Spyderco Endura4 Red FRN Trainer

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Description

MSRP n$120

SALE 79.99

Trainers or drones are non-sharpened knives that allow for the safe practice of Martial Blade Craft (MBC). They let the user learn deployment/retrieval techniques, perform drills, and develop confidence and muscle memory without risking cutting themselves or others with a sharp blade. The Endura Trainer is identical in weight and size to the ‘live’ model. To enhance the balance of the piece we’ve tapered the unsharpened tip and drilled holes through the blade, removing unnecessary bulk. Volcano grip texturing on both sides of the handle put the brakes on your hand slipping while training. All Spyderco training models have red handles designating them as non-sharpened. Tip-up carry. Endura trainers also fit the bill as a unsharpened practice knife to safely teach non-knife people the fundamental movements in safely opening and closing a folder.
  • Non-sharp blade for training purposed
  • Learn deployment/retrieval techniques, perform drills, and develop confidence and muscle memory without risking cuts
  • Volcano grip texturing on both sides of the handle put the brakes on your hand slipping while training
  • Tip-up carry
  • Drilled holes through the blade, removing unnecessary bulk
 

 

Spyderco Ark Personal Defense Knife w/2.50in Blade

4009970.jpg
MSRP 105
SALE 75
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Winter Bass Go To Lures

This is the time of year when I get a very serious case of cabin fever. All I can think about is fishing for, and catching, bass.

When the water temperature is in the 30s and 40s, catching bass can present a unique challenge, but the bass will still bite during the winter time and nothing warms you up more quickly than a big bass on the line.

Check out the slideshow for go-to winter bass lures and see if you can use them to catch some bass this winter.

 

Shaky Head

This finesse rig is effective on bass year around, but is especially effective on cold water bass. The shaky head consists of a small lead head hook with a small finesse worm attached to it. Fish it on rocky banks, slowly, with small bounces and shakes moving along the bottom.
When the bait is still, the worm will stand on end, with the tail moving with the current. To change it up a bit, you can put a baby brush hog or other small creature bait in place of the finesse worm.

Grub

Many times in the winter, bass will suspend over deeper water, relating to schools of baitfish. When this happens, a grub is a highly effective method to catch fish. Put a 3-5” grub on a lead head, cast it out and let it sink to the depth the fish are in and then slowly reel it back.
When I say slowly, I mean SLOWLY. Bass are very lethargic this time of year and looking for an easy meal, they aren’t going to chase a bait very far.

Finesse Jig

Fins n TalesSmall finesse jigs and hair jigs are best when bass are a little bit shallower on steep rocky banks. Hop them along the bottom, mimicking a crawfish or small blue gill. The hair jig is just like any other bass jig, except rather than a silicone or rubber skirt, it has hair on it.

It would be considered by most to be an “old- school” technique, but it is very effective for sluggish winter bass. Finesse jigs are slightly smaller than other bass jigs and usually have a “spider-style” skirt.

Wiggle Wart

Bass BlasterThe storm wiggle wart is a staple for highland lakes in the late winter/ early spring. My highest tournament finish ever came on a storm wiggle wart when the water temperature was 38°-42° F.
This bait is great on steeper banks that have chunk rock or boulders. The only thing to be sure of is that you are bouncing the bait off of rocks.

Football Jig

Cliff Pace used a football jig to win the Bassmaster’s Classic in February of 2013. This bait is similar to the finesse jig, but is better for deeper water, as it is heavier and will sink faster to the bottom.
The football jig gets its name because the head of the jig is football-shaped. As with baits mentioned earlier, this bait is slowly hopped and crawled along rocky bottom areas, mimicking a crawfish.

Jerkbait

The suspending jerk bait is likely the king of cold weather baits. It is a long slender bait that when retrieved at the correct depth will “suspend” in the water, rather than sinking to the bottom or floating to the top. The bait is great for suspending fish, although it does have a bit of a learning curve.
Cast it out and give it four to five cranks of your reel to get it down to the correct depth. After this, it is fished with a jerk and pause retrieve. Fish it slowly, some guys claim to twitch it and then stop and eat a sandwich before they twitch it again. Experiment with your retrieve until you figure out what the fish are liking on a given day.

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Whitetail Tracking Tips

Whitetail Tracking Tips From Lanny Benoit

1

Lanny Benoit is thought by many to be the best whitetail hunter alive today.

This is excerpted from the book, Benoit Bucks.  Signed copies are available at http://brycetowsley.com/store/products/benoit-bucks

“There is one way to tell a young buck, even one with big feet and maybe even a big deer that’s young. A young buck has never had much for antlers and he is used to dipping under branches without getting them tangled. When they are fawns, they are used to scooting under branches and stuff and it takes a while to get out of that habit. But, an old buck, one that’s had big antlers for a few years, won’t go under any branches he doesn’t have to. He is also more interested in walking in a straight line and not fooling around. He won’t be zigzagging around and wasting time like a young buck that still has a little ‘kid’ in him.

“Also, a big old buck has been walking these woods for a long time and he is not going to work any harder than he needs to. He knows all the best and easiest routes around and that’s what he is going to take.

“A lot of times those old bucks have nothing to do but sleep, eat and wander around. He may walk around all day, but he also won’t use any more energy than necessary and he will always take the easiest route.”

2“One of the mistakes that people make when tracking is they go too slowly when they are close and give the deer time to get nervous. If he knows you are after him and maybe has seen you, it’s better to keep moving at a fast pace. If you slow down, the deer has too much time to think about it and if he knows you are there, he will probably decide to run. If you move fast enough, he may wait to see you and if you step into the right opening, you may get a shot.

“The death creep is only good if the deer doesn’t know you are there. It’s meant to surprise a buck that isn’t aware of you. But if that deer has already heard you coming, you won’t get him with the death creep. If he is 100 yards or 200 yards away and he has heard you going into the death creep and trying to sneak up on him, it won’t work. You are better off to keep going along at a fast pace. Sure, he will run off most times, but sooner or later, you will see him.

“It’s like when you are driving down the road. Those deer can hear you coming for a long time before they see the truck, but a lot of times they wait until they see you or even until you stop before they run away. It’s the same when you are tracking bucks. They are going to hear you, but if you just keep going, they may wait long enough for a shot. Going into the death creep in this situation is a lot like stopping the truck. It’s a change and to them, that signifies danger.

“When there are noisy hunting conditions, you are better off to move right along at a good pace. The deer are usually going to hear you anyway. I have had lots of bucks I didn’t want to shoot stand and watch me walk on by them. As long as you don’t make eye contact and they don’t realize you have seen them, a lot of times they will stand still and let you walk by.

“I know it sounds crazy, but probably 85 percent of the bucks I have shot, I just walked up and shot them. The key is in seeing the buck. You have to be watching for the deer. You can’t keep your eyes down on the ground looking at the track.

“Those old bucks are kind of cranky anyway, particularly when they are in the rut. Just because they can hear you doesn’t necessarily mean that they know you are a man. They might just think you are a rival buck and they will stick around to kick your butt or try to intimidate you.

3“One thing is that when you do see him, you have to make up your mind quick and shoot him. The minute you stop to shoot, the buck is going to go into high alert. You can’t fool around and if you are sure it’s the buck you want, shoot him. You can’t try to judge his antlers to see if he is big enough. You simply don’t have time. You need to shoot him and hope his antlers are as good as you expected they might be from the sign along the track. Also, shoot at what you can see. Don’t look around or wait around for a better shot, because chances are you won’t get one.”

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Survival Trapping and Fishing

Survival Trapping and Fishing – A Numbers Game

March 15, 2013 by sensible survival

As I have stated in a previous post, it is difficult to survive in the wild by only gathering wild plants.  Unless you can gather nuts or mature seeds it is hard to come up with enough protein to survive.  You will almost certainly have to turn to animal protein to meet your body’s needs.

Hunting, in most instances, is one of the least efficient ways to gather animal protein.  If you are hunting, that’s all you can do; and you will probably have only one chance to either succeed or fail.  Fishing with a pole in your hand presents the same problem.  You must remain totally occupied with this one task, and you will either catch fish or you won’t.

Traps and trotlines offer multiple chances for success at the same time, and they will work for you while you take care of other tasks or even while you sleep.  The thing about trapping and trotlining is that they are both a numbers game.  If you just set out one trap you might as well go hunting.  If you just set out one hook you might as well stand on the bank and fish.  The idea is to set out as many hooks and traps as possible so that you can maximize your chances of securing food.

Let’s talk about fishing first.  It takes considerable cordage to set out a trotline.  If you have fifty feet of para-cord you could cut off ten feet, remove the outer sheath, and have seven, ten foot long pieces of 50lb. test nylon to cut up into drop lines.  If you don’t have any fish hooks, you can make fifteen or twenty gorge hooks in a fairly short time.  If you don’t have any cordage, then I would abandon the idea of a traditional trotline.  It would take hours and hours to twist up enough cordage to make such a line.  If you have to make your own cordage, then I would recommend that you go with drop lines.  A drop line is just a short piece of cordage with a baited hook and weight.  Locate an area where low trees and /or bushes hang out over the water, and tie a drop lines to various branches.  This won’t get you out into deep water like a trot line stretched across the river, but it will get hooks into the water.  You will have to turn up grubs, earthworms, and other insects or larvae to bait your hooks the first time, but if you make a catch you can use fish entrails for subsequent baiting.

Traps can be time consuming to make, but just one trap does not have much chance of securing food.  I think that I would set out fishing lines first, then gather materials to make traps around the fire at night.  The figure 4 deadfall and the rolling snare are both pretty easy to make.  The real time consumption comes when you are selecting locations for your traps and preparing the sets.  I would try and set at least ten good traps, and twenty would be better.  The more you set, the better your chance of making a catch.  If you set baited traps you will have to forage for the initial bait, but once you catch the first animal you can use entrails for subsequent traps.

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Bug-Out Shelter Kit

Bug-Out Shelter Kit

September 13, 2017 bt sensible survival

When some people are camping they like to be in a tent; other people like to sleep in the open or under a tarp.  I am in the later group.  If the weather is nice, I like to sleep in a hammock or a sleeping bag and bivy sack under the stars.  If the weather is threatening rain or if it is cold; I like to sleep under a tarp.  There are several reasons that I prefer a tarp.  For one, tarps are very light to carry.  My tarp set-up including lines, stakes, etc. weighs 3 lbs. 10 oz.(that’s about 1.65 kilos for my non-American friends).  For another thing, a tarp is very versatile as far as different set-ups.  A tarp can be set up to take advantage of a fire for additional heat in the winter, and it can be suspended overhead to allow better air circulation in the summer.  A tarp also allows better exterior visibility than a tent.  And lastly, a tarp can be used in conjunction with a hammock, something that is not possible with your average tent.

I’m going to do a couple of posts on my favorite tarp set-ups; but before I do that, I thought it might be good to show you my bug-out tarp kit.  Some might say that I include too much in my kit.  Some of the items could be foraged or manufactured in the wild.  This is true.  You could, in fact, build your entire shelter from foraged materials, and I encourage you learn how to do just that.  But, everything about survival is a trade-off.  You have to constantly be thinking about how much space you have in your pack, the weight of items that you carry, the time necessary to locate and/or make items in the wild, and the calories burned carrying items as opposed to the calories burned making items.  I consider the small amount of added weight in my kit to be negligible compared to the time and calories used to do things like cutting tent stakes.  My whole tarp kit weighs three pounds and ten ounces and rolls up into a nice 24” by 6” bundle.

Using the items in this kit I can make my three favorite tarp set-ups without any additional materials. So anyhow, this is what’s in my kit.

Item number one is my tarp.  It is an inexpensive vinyl tarp that you can get at Harbor Freight or Wal-Mart.  The tarp is about eight by ten feet.  I used tarps like this for several years; but I recently modified it, as outlined in the previous two posts, by painting the inside with reflective aluminum paint, and I have added a center loop to the outside.

Some set-ups require a ridge line.  I carry a twenty-five foot piece of 550 para-cord to use as a ridge line.  It has permanent loop tied into one end.  The ends of all of my cords have been melted to prevent fraying.  Be sure that you use good, military grade para-cord, not the cheap stuff from the craft store.

A 40 inch long bungee cord is handy for quickly setting up plow-point shelters (more on that in the next post).

I carry eight guy lines that come in handy for some set-ups.  Each guy line is six feet long with a permanent loop in one end.

My kit includes eight tent stakes.  Two on them are about eleven inches long and made of steel. 

The other six are seven inches long and made of aluminum.  These are actually aluminum nails that are used to hang rain gutters.  You can buy them at the hardware store for about fifty cents each. 

I keep them bundled together with one of those thread covered rubber hair bands.

Some small loops of para-cord come in handy for certain set-ups.  I carry six pre-made loops bundled together with a hair band.

I carry four little sticks that are pre-cut to about two inches long.  These are used for tarp attachments and to secure easy release knots (more on this later).

All of the lines, stakes, and etc. are stored in a small stuff-sack.

The last item in my kit is a piece of camo netting that I can drape across the front of my shelter to help conceal it.

So, that’s my tarp kit.  In subsequent posts I will show you how to make several tarp set-ups using the items in this kit.